Welcome to ASP.NET Guild

Be sure to come back often and tell others. If you have any tips, tricks, examples, please email them to me at chris.williams@techguilds.com and I will post them. Check out our ASP.NET QuickStart and C# QuckStart Libraries. Below is my latest articles.

Sunday, February 28, 2016

MVC RedirectToAction Explained for Beginners

RedirectToAction should be simple but sometimes they are confusing to beginners.  There are 3 ways to call RedirectToAction
  1. If you are already on a page within a controller you can use the shortest one which is only the caption and the action.

    eg. RedirectToAction("MyActionName")
  2. If you are referencing another controller or you want to include parameters.

    IMPORTANT: It may seem redundant but you need to list the action name twice. Notice Login is listed twice. 

    eg. RedirectToAction("Login", new RouteValueDictionary(new { controller = "Account", action = "Login", returnUrl = "/PersonalizedLearn" }));
I hope this clears up how RedirectToAction calls work.

If you have any questions feel free to email me at chris.williams@readwatchcreate.com



MVC Html.ActionLinks Explained for Beginners

Html.ActionLink should be simple but sometimes they are confusing to beginners.  There are 3 ways to call @Html.ActionLink:


  1. If you are already on a page within a controller you can use the shortest one which is only the caption and the action.

    eg. @Html.ActionLink("Click Here", "MyActionName")
  2. If you are referencing another controller or you want to include attributes on the link such as the css class

    eg.

    @Html.ActionLink("Click Here", "Index", "Home", null)

    @Html.ActionLink("Click Here", "Index", "Home", new { @class = "myHrefClass" })
  3. If you need to pass parameters to your action then you need to use the full version.

    IMPORTANT: If you are NOT Specifying a class, you still need to pass NULL or it will assume that the parameters you are passing are actually the attributes like in the version in the section way above.

    eg.

    @Html.ActionLink("Click Here", "Index","Home", new { paramName = value, param2Name = value}, null)

    @Html.ActionLink("Click Here", "Index","Home", new { paramName = value, param2Name = value}, new { @class = "myHrefClass" })


I hope this clears up how ActionLink calls work.  If you have any questions feel free to email me at chris.williams@readwatchcreate.com



Thursday, May 28, 2015

Redirect Url using IIS



Taken from https://support.microsoft.com/kb/324000

When you use Apache, you can redirect URLs by using the Redirect directive to point a folder or a location to a different folder on either the same Web site or a different Web site. You can also alias a folder to another location by using the Alias directive. If you use IIS, you can perform the same tasks by using the URL Redirection functionality.

To redirect a folder or file IIS:

  1. Log on to the Web server computer as an administrator.
  2. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  3. Double-click Administrative Tools, and then double click Internet Services Manager.
  4. Right-click the Web site or the folder, and then click Open.
  5. Right-click the folder display, point to New, and then click Folder.
  6. Return to Internet Services Manager.
  7. Right-click the folder that you just created, and then click Properties.
  8. Click the Directory tab, and then click A redirection to a URL.
  9. To redirect the folder to another URL, click the URL of the folder or the Web site that is described in step 4, and then type the complete URL to the new site in the Redirect to box.
  10. To redirect the folder to another folder within in this folder (for example, Projects to Sections/Departments/Projects), click A directory below this one, and then type the new folder in the Redirect to box.
  11. To mark the redirection type as a permanent redirection (and not a temporary redirection), click A permanent redirection for this resource
    If you use this setting, bookmarks and other details are automatically updated on some browsers.
  12. Click OK to save the changes.

Monday, May 18, 2015

ASP.NET Bootstrap Template Quickstart - Part 2: Using Email Address as UserName

When you first generate your application, the registration page insists on a UserName and Email Address from your clients, however it is more common to reduce the number of fields the user has to fill in as it increases registration.  The Email Address is much more valuable than the UserName as you can interact with it.

There are a couple changes you must make to use Email Address as the UserName:
  1. Change the UserName field to Email Address.
  2. In the control open tag you must add RequiresEmail=false
    If you forget to set this you will get the error message: 

    RegisterUser: CreateUserWizardStep.ContentTemplate does not contain an IEditableTextControl with ID Email for the e-mail, this is required if RequireEmail = true.

  3. Next you will want to add a validator to your username field to ensure it is in email format.  There are a few ways to do it.  You can use the RegEx Validator as a minimum or extend it to do a DNS lookup depending on your needs. Below is a sample I got from a StackOverflow article:

    <asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="regexEmailValid" runat="server" ValidationExpression="\w+([-+.]\w+)*@\w+([-.]\w+)*\.\w+([-.]\w+)*" ControlToValidate="tbEmail" ErrorMessage="Invalid Email Format"></asp:RegularExpressionValidator>
If you have any tips, tricks or resources you would like to share with the guild email me at chris.williams@techguilds.com

ASP.NET Bootstrap Template Quickstart - Part 1: Creating a new application

When you create your next project, choosing the WebForms application will do a lot more for you than previous versions. For example, you now get a solution built on Bootstrap, it uses friendly names for links eg. /About instead of /About.aspx. It provides you with two master pages: one for regular sites and one for mobile. To start using this template follow these steps:


  1. Open Visual Studio and choose to File -> New Project
  2. In the left panel Click on Visual C# -> Web -> Visual Studio 2012
  3. On the center panel choose ASP.NET Web Forms Application
  4. At the bottom choose where to put your project and give your project a name
Voila, you have yourself a great application to build on top of.  You can start applying your design and customization. 

In our followup articles we will cover some of the functional changes you may want to make to to this template to suit your needs.  



If you have any tips, tricks or resources you would like to share with the guild email me at chris.williams@techguilds.com

Sunday, July 06, 2014

Cannot find Microsoft.Web.Administration.dll

If you are getting this error, the most likely cause is that you do not have IIS 7 installed on your computer.\
Here are the steps involved to install IIS 7 on Windows 8.1

Click on the start menu and type Control Panel. When the choices come up choose Control Panel


Click on Programs

Click on Turn Windows features on or off

Click on Internet Information Service and click OK


Windows will apply the changes.  Windows will tell you when its complete.  Click Close on the dialog.

You should now be able to reference the Microsoft.Web.Administration.dll

If you are getting started with IIS 7 and would like assistance getting started check out the ASP.NET IIS 7 QuickStart.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Experience with version 4 of .Net (No version 1.5 or 2.0

I saw an odd job listing today it wanted someone with the following:
  • Experience with version 4 of .Net (No version 1.5 or 2);
I thought it was kind of odd.  Why do they prefer someone without 1.5 or 2.0 experience.  I did some Google and found a basic rundown of the differences.   The job post does not list WCF experience or LINQ or Entity Framework or MVC.

.Net 2.0
1.CLR Features
2.Delegates
3.Other basic concepts

.Net 3.0
1.WCF
2.WPF
3.WF

.Net 3.5 - Enhanced Feature of .Net 3.0
- LINQ

.Net 4.0 
1.Parallelism
2.Entity Framework

For more details you could always look through these but that is not really the point of my article.

.NET 4.0
.NET 3.5
.NET 2.0

At first I thought it was odd but then it clicked. This kind of reminds me of the article written by Ryan O'Connell about all the things you would have different opinions on.

if-you-were-born-in-the-90s

So I am guessing that rather than a technology requirement in as much as its a personality requirement.  If you started with .NET 4.0 you don't know any of the sloppy hacks we had to do regarding stuff as simple as reading the config file.  Remember the including of a separate DLLto read the web.config in 2.0 as opposed to 1.1 having it native in the DLL.  I guess if you remember that you don't qualify for this job.

I look forward to hearing other your comments.  I know I would prefer someone who has been through the trenches than one who just arrived as a new private but that is just my opinion how about you.

If you have more insight then please email me at chris.williams@threepointturn.com or dennis.augustine@threepointturn.com

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Ever wonder what you would do without technology...

JJ Abrams does a decent job showing the results of technology disappearing. Yes its not 100% realistic but if it was NBC would not be able to show it.

However from watching this episode, it gives you an idea of what would happen to that rich guy at Google.

Check out the pilot episode available on NBC.

Monday, August 13, 2012

.NET Postback loads Internet Explorer 7 Stylesheet on Postback in Chrome or FireFox

When using the Telerik AJAX Panel, on postback you may find that the updated controls will use the wrong stylesheet. Here is an article detailing the issue:

.NET Postback makes other browsers load ie conditional comments

The article mentions no workaround, however, since you are working in a .NET environment you do have the option of server side browser detection and then push the proper CSS for the browser. This would bypass the bug in the conditional comments.

Another option which is recommended in the link above is using HeadJS which will detect browser and apply the correct styles.

If you have any tips, tricks or resources you would like to share with the Guild, please email them to Chris Williams at chrisw_88@hotmail.com and we will post them here.

Are you a .NET Developer or Contractor interested in working with Sitecore or Dynamics CRM?

Apply for our Mentorship Program. If accepted, we will mentor you on Sitecore and provide you with project to help you build your skills and make some money at the same time. If you are interested send your resume with details on why you want to work with Sitecore or Dynamics CRM to: Chris Williams - chris.williams@techguilds.com or Dennis Augustine - dennis.augustine@techguilds.com We look forward to working with you to achieve your goals.